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Listing

Secondary Education Science Teacher

Actively Recruiting

Openings

30 currently recruiting

Service Dates

July 6, 2020 - September 15, 2022

Application Window

August 1, 2019 - January 1, 2020

Location

  • Tanzania

Contact Information

Rachel Hatch
rhatch2@peacecorps.gov

Hosted By

Position Details

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Peace Corps Volunteer

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Listing Details

Description

Karibu Tanzania! Present since 1961, Tanzania is one of Peace Corps’ oldest programs. Despite progress in reducing barriers to secondary education, Tanzania has a limited number of qualified teachers, particularly in the fields of Math and Science (mainly Physics). Stakeholders have recognized the need for students to develop skills in these fields to enable problem solving both in and out of the classroom. In response to this, the Peace Corps Tanzania project emphasizes hands-on learning, extracurricular activities, and community involvement in student learning to boost student achievement and encourage them to become self-reliant problem solvers.

Peace Corps Secondary Education Science Teachers work in rural Tanzanian villages and teach General Science, Chemistry, Biology and Physics to students aged 12-20. Volunteers prepare lesson plans using a variety of teaching methods and syllabus developed by the Ministry of Education. To connect classroom concepts to real-world situations, Volunteers also organize experiential learning activities like field trips and guest speakers. Volunteers might be asked to teach additional subjects as needed depending on their knowledge and background. As part of capacity building activities, Volunteers are encouraged to develop professional relationships with Tanzanian teachers and organize communities of practice, or spaces to share best teaching practices. In addition to teaching students and working with teachers, Volunteers are encouraged to engage community members to increase their involvement in student learning. This may be done by organizing events like math competitions or science fairs and training community members on gender-equitable techniques that increase access to learning.

Volunteers can expect to encounter large class sizes (50+) and limited resources. The main teaching materials will probably be a blackboard and chalk, though some schools may be better equipped. In Tanzania, schools use a centralized curriculum provided by the Ministry of Education. Most of the teaching resources are available locally. Peace Corps also provides Volunteers basic materials and resources to use in their teaching.

On average, Volunteers teach 11-16 hours per week. Along with classroom teaching, many are involved in school clubs, sports, youth conferences, and other extracurricular activities. Volunteers will integrate Peace Corps Tanzania's cross-sectoral program priorities into their teaching and community development. This includes HIV/AIDS, Malaria, Gender, Food Security, and Technology. Volunteers also have the opportunity to serve on a variety of Peace Corps committees that support the country program, which include Education, Health and Agriculture.

Peace Corps Tanzania promotes gender awareness and girls’ education and empowerment. You will receive training on gender challenges and you will have the opportunity to implement gender-related activities that are contextually appropriate. During your service, you will look for ways to work with community members to promote gender-equitable norms and increase girls’ sense of agency. As part of your work, you will also report on these efforts.

Corporal punishment is legal and a common way teachers discipline their students. While the government has regulations regarding permissible forms of corporal punishment, these rules are not always followed or enforced at the local level. Volunteers will most likely encounter corporal punishment, which may or may not adhere to the legal restrictions. Many Volunteers find this aspect of life very challenging, particularly when it is necessary to develop good working relationships with colleagues. Peace Corps Tanzania has implemented a Student Friendly Schools program to open a dialogue between Volunteers and their colleagues, and to explore culturally appropriate and acceptable alternatives to corporal punishment.

Karibu Tanzania! Present since 1961, Tanzania is one of Peace Corps’ oldest programs. Despite progress in reducing barriers to secondary education, Tanzania has a limited number of qualified teachers, particularly in the fields of Math and Science (mainly Physics). Stakeholders have recognized the need for students to develop skills in these fields to enable problem solving both in and out of the classroom. In response to this, the Peace Corps Tanzania project emphasizes hands-on learning, extracurricular activities, and community involvement in student learning to boost student achievement and encourage them to become self-reliant problem solvers.

Peace Corps Secondary Education Science Teachers work in rural Tanzanian villages and teach General Science, Chemistry, Biology and Physics to students aged 12-20. Volunteers prepare lesson plans using a variety of teaching methods and syllabus developed by the Ministry of Education. To connect classroom concepts to real-world situations, Volunteers also organize experiential learning activities like field trips and guest speakers. Volunteers might be asked to teach additional subjects as needed depending on their knowledge and background. As part of capacity building activities, Volunteers are encouraged to develop professional relationships with Tanzanian teachers and organize communities of practice, or spaces to share best teaching practices. In addition to teaching students and working with teachers, Volunteers are encouraged to engage community members to increase their involvement in student learning. This may be done by organizing events like math competitions or science fairs and training community members on gender-equitable techniques that increase access to learning.

Volunteers can expect to encounter large class sizes (50+) and limited resources. The main teaching materials will probably be a blackboard and chalk, though some schools may be better equipped. In Tanzania, schools use a centralized curriculum provided by the Ministry of Education. Most of the teaching resources are available locally. Peace Corps also provides Volunteers basic materials and resources to use in their teaching.

On average, Volunteers teach 11-16 hours per week. Along with classroom teaching, many are involved in school clubs, sports, youth conferences, and other extracurricular activities. Volunteers will integrate Peace Corps Tanzania's cross-sectoral program priorities into their teaching and community development. This includes HIV/AIDS, Malaria, Gender, Food Security, and Technology. Volunteers also have the opportunity to serve on a variety of Peace Corps committees that support the country program, which include Education, Health and Agriculture.

Peace Corps Tanzania promotes gender awareness and girls’ education and empowerment. You will receive training on gender challenges and you will have the opportunity to implement gender-related activities that are contextually appropriate. During your service, you will look for ways to work with community members to promote gender-equitable norms and increase girls’ sense of agency. As part of your work, you will also report on these efforts.

Corporal punishment is legal and a common way teachers discipline their students. While the government has regulations regarding permissible forms of corporal punishment, these rules are not always followed or enforced at the local level. Volunteers will most likely encounter corporal punishment, which may or may not adhere to the legal restrictions. Many Volunteers find this aspect of life very challenging, particularly when it is necessary to develop good working relationships with colleagues. Peace Corps Tanzania has implemented a Student Friendly Schools program to open a dialogue between Volunteers and their colleagues, and to explore culturally appropriate and acceptable alternatives to corporal punishment.
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Benefits

Health coverage, Housing, Living allowance, Non-competitive eligibility (federal jobs), Stipend, Student loan forbearance, Training

Education Requirements

College Graduate

Desired Languages

English

Other Conditions

Prohibits paid work outside of the sponsoring agency at any time
Subject to criminal background check

Service Details

Focus Areas

Education & Youth

Weekly Hours

40

Service Type

Combination of direct and indirect service

Service Environment

Indoor and Outdoor

Placement

Individual Placement

Service Setting

Community-based Nonprofit, Community Development Organization, Early Childhood Program, Elementary School, Health Clinic/Other Health Organization, Higher Education Institution, High School, Hospital, Local Educational Agency, Local Government Agency, Recreation or Youth Center, Social Enterprise (nonprofit)

Activity Types

Hands On Activities, Office Activities, Professional Activities

Contact Information

Rachel Hatch
rhatch2@peacecorps.gov

Hosted By

Position Details

View the Position

Peace Corps Volunteer

View Position